Serpina, La Serva Padrona  production: Peter Kazaras

Serpina, La Serva Padrona

production: Peter Kazaras

Königin der Nacht, Die Zauberflöte  production: James Marvel

Königin der Nacht, Die Zauberflöte

production: James Marvel

Andromède, Persée et Andromède  production: James Robinson

Andromède, Persée et Andromède

production: James Robinson

 

“La Serva Padrona,' is all laughs, and the duo of soprano Jana McIntyre... conveyed the piece’s charms seamlessly. McIntyre dispatched her assignment with a silvery sheen (all while contending bravely with recalcitrant sets and props) into a performance of comic bravura... zinging, trilled “r’s” of soprano Jana McIntyre as a saucy and domineering maid... the sheer firepower and finesse of the singing carried the night. "

- Steven Winn, San Francisco Classical Voice

“The real discovery of the night was soprano Jana McIntyre, an enchanting Zerlina with a lovely light soprano that emphasized the character’s youth and naiveté”

- Jonathan Pell, Opera News

“Not to be outdone, the Queen of the Night (Jana McIntyre), delivers a performance filled with the stuff of great nightmares — complete with 6-inch talons on her fingers that she flexes with serious wicked intent. McIntyre’s vocal gymnastics are performed with effortless ease. Her signature second act aria is breathtakingly brilliant.”

— Wayne F. Anthony, The Blade

"Jana McIntyre consumes the stage as Andromède. Her lovely voice, with a slight French accent, reaches high and low comfortably. The challenges of the role are not perceptible because McIntyre has thoroughly mastered difficulties and made them pleasures."

     

- Susan Hall, Berkshire Fine Arts

“Jana McIntyre nailed the Queen of the Night’s two arias and, even more impressively, looked like she was having fun doing it.”

— Joanne Sydney Lessner, Opera News

“Standouts were... Jana McIntrye, whose sensational, always musically phrased Queen of the Night exceeded many”

— David Shengold, Gay City News

 
Amore, Orfeo ed Euridice  production: Douglas Fitch, Zack Winokur, Anthony Roth Costanzo

Amore, Orfeo ed Euridice

production: Douglas Fitch, Zack Winokur, Anthony Roth Costanzo

"The Gluck was a much more straightforward affair. Joining Costanzo in the endeavor were soprano Kiera Duffy as Euridice, soprano Jana McIntyre as Amore... Both sopranos demonstrated fine, healthy voices—adept and flexible and rigorously exact. "

- Patrick Clement James, Parterre Box

 

“Jana McIntyre, the Queen of the Night, was virtuosic, all confidence and clarity; hers… the finest performance”

- John Kissane, Revue

“Soprano Jana McIntyre did not disappoint, offering a dazzling upper register with pin-point control in “O zittre nicht”. The even more difficult “Der hölle Rache” featured a flittering, glittering set of ringing high Fs. This was an impressive run through this show-stopping number.”

— Paul J. Pelkonen, Superconductor, Culture Magazine

”Jana McIntyre blends earthiness and innocence in a sweetly endearing Zerlina, as in the way she teasingly ministers to a badly beaten Masetto in “Vedrai carino,””

- James D. Watts, The Tulsa World

“Surprisingly the biggest voices seemed to belong to singers who played small parts – ie, Jana McIntyre as the shepherd boy…”

- Neil Kurtzman, Opera and Medicine

“The evening’s finale sparkled with the technique and comic abandon required by Rossini’s Le Comte Ory. Soprano Jana McIntyre (Santa Barbara, CA) engaged in a tug of war for vocal supremacy, with Josh Lovell playing the title character. Let’s call it a draw. Both drew hearty cheers from the audience and they were equally charming, even if McIntyre’s agility was truly breathtaking.”

— Philip Campbell, The Bay Area Reporter

“Jana McIntyre combined a dancer’s grace, mercurial wit and a vibrant soprano tone."   

    - David J. Baker, Opera News

“Here the young woman, Serpina, was coquettishly sung by Jana McIntyre, who possesses exquisite vocal technique, great acting ability, and a soprano voice that will take her far. Jana McIntyre is definitely a singer to watch! …as superb in their roles as one could ever hope to hear.”

- James Roy MacBean, The Berkeley Daily Planet